Tips & Tricks

What you will need to make Beer
  • 15, 25 or 33 Litre Bucket + Lid: where you will make the beer
  • Steriliser Cleaner: Ready to start? Clean your equipment to avoid contamination
  • Syphon with Tap: Transfering the Beer
  • Beer Paddle: It takes a long spoon or paddle to mix the ingredients!
  • Hydrometer + Trial Jar: Lets you check on the alcohol content so you know when it’s ready
  • Thermometer: Helps you keep your brew at the correct temperature
  • Brewing Sugar: Ferments easier and gives a cleaner taste than household sugar.
  • Cider Kits: Choose from a variety of cider kits Apple, Pear etc (Instructions are on the reverse of each beer kit)

If you’re bottling your Cider you will need the following:

  • Beer Bottles: Choose from 6 pack, 15 Pack or Grolsch Style
  • Crown Caps: Range of colours Red, Gold, Yellow or Blue, higher quantity packs available on order
  • Beer Capper: You can also store your beer in a Keg (Beer Barrel) if not bottling
What you will need to make Cider
  • 15, 25 or 33 Litre Bucket + Lid: where you will make the beer
  • Steriliser Cleaner: Ready to start? Clean your equipment to avoid contamination
  • Syphon with Tap: Transfering the Beer
  • Beer Paddle: It takes a long spoon or paddle to mix the ingredients!
  • Hydrometer + Trial Jar: Lets you check on the alcohol content so you know when it’s ready
  • Thermometer: Helps you keep your brew at the correct temperature
  • Brewing Sugar: Ferments easier and gives a cleaner taste than household sugar.
  • Cider Kits: Choose from a variety of cider kits Apple, Pear etc (Instructions are on the reverse of each beer kit)

If you’re bottling your Cider you will need the following:

  • Beer Bottles: Choose from 6 pack, 15 Pack or Grolsch Style
  • Crown Caps: Range of colours Red, Gold, Yellow or Blue, higher quantity packs available on order
  • Beer Capper: You can also store your beer in a Keg (Beer Barrel) if not bottling
What you will need to make Country Style Cider (Cider from your own Fruit)
  • 15, 25 or 33 Litre Bucket + Lid: where you will crush and pulp your fruit
  • 1 Glass Demijohn: for fermenting and maturing Cider
  • 1 Airlock + Bung (Rubber or Cork): Fill it with water, it lets the gasses escape and prevents contamination
  • Steriliser Cleaner: Ready to start? Clean your equipment to avoid contamination
  • Syphon with Tap: Transferring the Cider
  • Spoon: It takes a long spoon or paddle to mix the ingredients!
  • Funnel
  • Muslin Bags: Ideal for straining/ filtering fruit
  • Recipe Book ( Real Cider Making on a Small Scale)
  • Hydrometer + Trial Jar: Lets you check on the alcohol content so you know when it’s ready
  • Thermometer: Helps you keep your brew at the correct temperature
  • Yeast: Champagne
  • Pectolase: ensure maximum yield of juice and flavour from fruits and alike, and to prevent possible pectin hazes
  • Beer Bottles: Choose from 6 pack, 15 Pack or Grolsch Style
  • Crown Caps: Range of colours Red, Gold, Yellow or Blue, higher quantity packs available on order
  • Beer Capper

You can also store your beer in a Keg (Beer Barrel) if not bottling

What you will need to make Wine
  • 1 Glass Demijohn: for fermenting and maturing wine
  • 1 Airlock + Bung (Rubber or Cork): Fill it with water, it lets the gasses escape and prevents contamination
  • Steriliser Cleaner: Ready to start? Clean your equipment to avoid contamination
  • Syphon with Tap: Transfering the wine
  • 30 Waxed Corks: Perfect for sealing bottles
  • Hand Corker: Helps get those corks into the bottle
  • Wine Bottles
  • Funnel
  • Recipe Book (First Steps in Wine Making By CJ.J Berry)
  • Hydrometer + Trial Jar: Lets you check on the alcohol content so you know when it’s ready
  • Thermometer: Helps you keep your brew at the correct temperature
  • Yeast: Red, White, Burgundy red, Champagne etc
  • Nutrient: To ensure rapid and complete fermentation of wine
  • Pectolase: ensure maximum yield of juice and flavour from fruits and alike, and to prevent possible pectin hazes
  • Wine Concentrate Kit: choose from a variety of brands Cellar 7, California Connoisseur, Cantina etc.
What you will need to make Country Wine (Wine from your own Fruit or Veg)
  • 15, 25 or 33 Litre Bucket + Lid: where you will crush fruit or veg
  • 1 Glass Demijohn: for fermenting and maturing wine
  • 1 Airlock + Bung (Rubber or Cork): Fill it with water, it lets the gasses escape and prevents contamination
  • Steriliser Cleaner: Ready to start? Clean your equipment to avoid contamination
  • Syphon with Tap: Transferring the wine
  • 30 Waxed Corks: Perfect for sealing bottles
  • Hand Corker: Helps get those corks into the bottle
  • Spoon: It takes a long spoon or paddle to mix the ingredients!
  • Funnel
  • Muslin Bags: Ideal for straining/ filtering fruit when wine making
  • Recipe Book (130 New Winemaking Recipes By CJ.J Berry)
  • Hydrometer + Trial Jar: Lets you check on the alcohol content so you know when it’s ready
  • Thermometer: Helps you keep your brew at the correct temperature
  • Yeast: Red, White, Burgundy red, Champagne etc
  • Nutrient: To ensure rapid and complete fermentation of wine
  • Pectolase: ensure maximum yield of juice and flavour from fruits and alike, and to prevent possible pectin hazes
Pulpmaster - By JP Homebrew

The Pulpmaster is a simple but effective fruit-crushing tool, which is used in conjunction with an electric drill. The Pulpmaster consists of a stainless steel cutting blade with spindle, a plastic bucket cover with centre bearing and a two gallon (9 litre) bucket. About six pounds of halved or quartered apples are placed in the bucket and crushed by the rotating blade powered by the drill.

PALE MALT

Provides the bulk of the fermentable sugar in all British Ales.Possesses sufficient diastatic enzymes to convert all fermentable maltose and non fermentable dextrins.Maris Otter,Halcyon and Pipkin are all excellent barleys from which pale malt is produced.Each has its own individual flavour and experimentation is strongly advised.

LAGER MALT

Can be made from almost any brewing barley but most commonly Halcyon. It is kilned at a slightly lower temperature than pale malt to give a lighter colour and a more delicate flavour.Lager malt can be mashed perfectly well with the normal one temperature infusion mash.The difficult and time consuming decoction mash is unnecessary.

PILSNER MALT

The palest of all malts.Essential for making the finest pilsner style beers.Single temperature infusion mash is sufficient but care must be taken to ensure that complete starch conversion has been achieved.

MILD ALE MALT

Produced from triumph barley,mild ale malt is kilned slightly hotter than pale malt and has a richer malt flavour perfectly suited to mild ales.Can be used to provide 100% of fermentable sugars or can be combined with dark malts.

VIENNA MALT

Dried at low temperatures to avoid caramelisation then kilned off at a fairly high temperature.Vienna malt imparts a wouderful rich aroma characteristic of German Oktoberfest beers.It can be used on its own or in conjuntion with pilsner malt to make malt accented lagers.

MUNICH MALT

Unlike vienna malt,Munich malt is kilned while the moisture content is still quite high which provides for some caramelisation of the sugars as its fairly high finishing off temperature.There are insufficient enzymes for Munich malt to be used on its own,but it can comprise up to 60% of the mash if combined with high enzymee Pilsner malt to make the classic malty Munich Dunkel(dark )lagers.

CARAPILS MALT

A very pale crystal malt which has no enzymes,so must be mashed with other malts.Can be used to add body to any style of beer which makes it a very versitile.Especially useful where sugar is being used in the recipe.

AMBER MALT

A characteristic “biscuit flavour and a dark amber colour are the properties of this very rare malt.Adds complexity to all dark ales and can be included in Bitters in small amounts.Home brewers would do well to familiarise themselves with this malt.

BROWN MALT

A very rare malt,imparts a slightly smoky flavour to Brown Ales and Porters.Has no enzyme activity so should be used with pale malt.A must for the more adventurous brewer.

CRYSTAL MALT

Cystal malt is kilned at mashing temperature of 65-70c at a high moisture content which converts most of the starch to sugar.This makes Crystal malt invaluable for adding body to malt extract brews as well as full mashed beers.Its nutty flavour is evident in many styles of British ale.

CHOCOLATE MALT

Thisis very versitile malt.Its smooth flavour makes it ideal for darkening ales and lagers.Every home brewer should have this malt in his store.

BLACK MALT

Roasted even darker than chocolate malt,its slightly burnt flavour is inapropriate in lagers but is most suitable for many dark beers.A little of this malt goes a long way,so it should be used sparingly.

WHEAT MALT

Wheat is a difficult grain to malt,as it has no husk,can cause problems with the run off if used in large amounts.Its benefits,howerver,far outweigh the disadvantages.It promotes a beautiful,creamy head and gives beer a lovely soft texture.German style wheat beers include up to 60% wheat malt in the grist but multi-temperature mashes should be employed to degrade the higher protein content.Flaked wheat malt helps to avoid the run-off problem.

ROASTED BARLEY

Although not strickly a malt,it is very highly kilned raw barley.It is included here as its an essential ingredient of dry stouts.It has the sharp burnt character of black malt but not the malty but acrid sweetness.Roasted barley can be used sparingly to darken most ales.

Frequently Asked Questions

How much wine yeast should be used?

About a teaspoon full for most things seems too work. Too much yeast will make it taste yeasty. Too little may result in a slow fermentation which risks spoiling bacteria. It’s not that critical as yeast multiply at the start of fermentation when there is oxygen present and as long as they have enough nutrients.

Is glucose the only sugar that will cause fermentation?

No. Yeast will break other sugars down to simple sugars like glucose and then act on the simple sugars. Not all sugars are broken down. The ones that are not fermentable are left in the brew and add sweetness to the brew.

What is the Difference between brewers yeast and baking yeast?

They are pretty similar. The difference is in the by-product of fermentation. Baker yeast does not have the same taste. I think the alcohol tolerance is similar (5% by volume) . In times gone by people often used bakers yeast in place of brewers yeast for home brew. (They probably do so now). Some literature says do not use bakers yeast as it leave a flowery taste but I suspect it is not the yeast and more the way the yeast is packaged. So to summary the brew will taste a little different but its not a bad alternative.

Why is my wine cloudy?

This could be due to different causes.

  • The wine might still be fermenting.
  • The temperature could be too hot or too cold.
  • The presence of bacteria, pectin, starch or protein.

Well made wines will clear naturally given time and it is important that they are given time to clear. However, sometimes we need to give them a helping hand and resort to fining or filtering. The use of a good quality wine yeast will ensure that a firm sediment forms during fermentation and that any subsequent movement of the fermenting vessel is unlikely to cause “swirling up” clouding the wine.

If you require any information or advice please ask at the counter or Email at info@homebrew-kits.co.uk. We strive for excellent customer service so if you require any particular product that we do not already stock let us know and we can have it ordered.